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Vaccinations and the Elderly- Part II of a II Part Series

Looking for regular updates as to where influenza is circulating including the latest information on the swine flu? Check www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly

Another good source to keep you updated on how the flu season is spreading in the United States and the world is at:  https://www.google.org/flutrends/us

(3/26/17)- During week 11 (March 12-18, 2017), influenza activity decreased, but remained elevated in the United States.

 The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 11 was influenza A (H3). The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories decreased.
 The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.
Two influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
A cumulative rate for the season of 50.4 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 population was reported.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 3.2%, which is above the national baseline of 2.2%. Seven of ten regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels. 12 states experienced high ILI activity; six states experienced moderate ILI activity; nine states experienced low ILI activity; New York City, Puerto Rico, and 23 states experienced minimal ILI activity; and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
The geographic spread of influenza in 36 states was reported as widespread; Guam, Puerto Rico and 10 states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia and two states reported local activity; two states reported sporadic activity; and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported no activity
.

 

(3/19/17)- During week 10 (March 5-11, 2017), influenza activity decreased, but remained elevated in the United States.

The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 10 was influenza A (H3). The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories decreased.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.
 Five influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
A cumulative rate for the season of 46.9 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 population was reported.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 3.7%, which is above the national baseline of 2.2%. Seven of ten regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels. 18 states experienced high ILI activity; seven states experienced moderate ILI activity; five states experienced low ILI activity; New York City, Puerto Rico, and 20 states experienced minimal ILI activity; and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
The geographic spread of influenza in 36 states was reported as widespread; Guam, Puerto Rico and 11 states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia and three states reported local activity; and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported no activity

 

(3/13/17)- During week 9 (February 26-March 4, 2017), influenza activity decreased, but remained elevated in the United States.

The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 9 was influenza A (H3). The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories decreased.
 The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.
 Eight influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
 A cumulative rate for the season of 43.5 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 population was reported.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 3.6%, which is above the national baseline of 2.2%. Eight of ten regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels. 14 states experienced high ILI activity; 12 states experienced moderate ILI activity; eight states experienced low ILI activity; New York City, Puerto Rico, and 16 states experienced minimal ILI activity; and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
The geographic spread of influenza in Puerto Rico and 39 states was reported as widespread; Guam and eight states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia and two states reported local activity; one state reported sporadic activity; and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported no activity
.

 

(3/5/17)- During week 8 (February 19-25 2017), influenza activity remained elevated in the United States

 The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 8 was influenza A (H3). The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories remained elevated.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.: Six influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported
A cumulative rate for the season of 39.4 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 population was reported.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 4.8%, which is above the national baseline of 2.2%. All 10 regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels. 27 states experienced high ILI activity; four states experienced moderate ILI activity; New York City, Puerto Rico and six states experienced low ILI activity; 13 states experienced minimal ILI activity; and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
The geographic spread of influenza in Puerto Rico and 43 states was reported as widespread; Guam and five states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia and two states reported local activity; and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported sporadic activity

(2/22/17)- During week 6 (February 5-11, 2017), influenza activity increased in the United States.

The most frequently identified influenza virus subtype reported by public health laboratories during week 6 was influenza A (H3). The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for influenza in clinical laboratories increased.
The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the system-specific epidemic threshold in the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Mortality Surveillance System.
Nine influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported.
A cumulative rate for the season of 29.4 laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 population was reported.
The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was 5.2%, which is above the national baseline of 2.2%. All 10 regions reported ILI at or above their region-specific baseline levels. New York City and 28 states experienced high ILI activity; Puerto Rico and seven states experienced moderate ILI activity; five states experienced low ILI activity; nine states experienced minimal ILI activity; and the District of Columbia had insufficient data.
The geographic spread of influenza in Puerto Rico and 46 states was reported as widespread; Guam and four states reported regional activity; the District of Columbia reported local activity; and the U.S. Virgin Islands reported sporadic activity.

 

(2/11/17)- During week 5 (January 29-February 4, 2017), influenza activity increased in the United States.
(2/6/17)- During week 4 (January 22-28, 2017), influenza activity increased in the United States.
(1/31/17)- During week 3 (January 15-21, 2017), influenza activity increased in the United States..
(1/22/17)- During week 2 (January 8-14, 2017), influenza activity increased in the United States.

FOR AN INFORMATIVE AND PERSONAL ARTICLE ON PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS WHEN SELECTING A NURSING HOME SEE OUR ARTICLE "How to Select a Nursing Home"

Please see Vaccinations and the Elderly –Part I of this Series

By Allan Rubin
updated March 26, 2017

http://www.therubins.com

To e-mail: hrubin12@nyc.rr.com or allanrubin4@gmail.com

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